IR

6 January 2015

Different infrared photo from Crete

Posted in: crete, infrared, IR, landscape|

Daily photo – Different infrared

Infrared photo from Crete

Today I would like to share another infrared image I took back in 2013 on the island of Crete. This one is a bit different on the processing side. Normally what most IR-photographers do is to swap red & blue channels of the infrared photo to achieve blue sky in the output image. This time, however, I decided not to swap those two channels because I found the image quite interesting.

If you’re interested in infrared photography, I have something for you. I wrote several tutorials about it and shared them on my blog:

  • Introduction to infrared photography – will introduce you to the world of infrared photograhy. In this part I talk about equipment needed to get started with infrared photography and I also give some tips on taking infrared photos,
  • Post-processing infrared photos – in this part I focus on the post-processing of IR photos to get them this very typical look with blue skies and white foliage.
  • Simulating infrared photography in Photoshop – if you don’t have tools necessary to create real infrared photos, there is an easy trick how to create fake IR photo directly in Photoshop.

Camera Info

Finally some EXIF info:

Technical details:
Camera: Canon 5D MK III (read my review here)
Lens: Canon 24-105 f/4 L IS USM
Focal length: 24 mm
Aperture: f/14.0
Exposure time: 13 s
ISO: 1600
Number of exposures: 1
E.V. Step: n/a
Flash used: no
Tripod: yes
Filters: no
Technique: infrared
Software: Magic Lantern 2.3, Photomatix Pro 5.0 (Contrast Optimizer), Lightroom 5.4, Photoshop CC, Topaz Clarity, Topaz Detail
22 December 2014

Published again and IR photo from Crete

Posted in: camerapixo, crete, infrared, IR, landscape|

Published again

It looks like another of my photos has been just published in Camerapixo magazine in Hot Shots Vol. 4 issue. This time, photo they published is one of my all time favourites – Street in Barcelona. BTW it’s 4th time I’m published in this magazine, thank you +Artur J. Heller and +Anetta G. Heller for that wonderful opportunity! Hopefully I will manage to push some photos into Camerapixo magazine in 2015 as well 😉
Make sure to visit magazine’s website, as it’s full of really great and inspiring photos! Probably one of the best collection of images you can find online.

Daily photo – Infrared photo from Crete

Infrared photo from Crete

Today I would like to share infrared image I took in 2013 on the island of Crete.

If you’re interested in infrared photography, I have something for you. I wrote several tutorials about it and shared them on my blog:

  • Introduction to infrared photography – will introduce you to the world of infrared photograhy. In this part I talk about equipment needed to get started with infrared photography and I also give some tips on taking infrared photos,
  • Post-processing infrared photos – in this part I focus on the post-processing of IR photos to get them this very typical look with blue skies and white foliage.
  • Simulating infrared photography in Photoshop – if you don’t have tools necessary to create real infrared photos, there is an easy trick how to create fake IR photo directly in Photoshop.

Camera Info

Finally some EXIF info:

Technical details:
Camera: Canon 5D MK III (read my review here)
Lens: Canon 24-105 f/4 L IS USM
Focal length: 24 mm
Aperture: f/14.0
Exposure time: 15 s
ISO: 1600
Number of exposures: 1
E.V. Step: n/a
Flash used: no
Tripod: yes
Filters: no
Technique: infrared
Software: Magic Lantern 2.3, Photomatix Pro 5.0 (Contrast Optimizer), Lightroom 5.4, Photoshop CC, Topaz Clarity, Topaz Detail
13 January 2014

Tutorial: simulating infrared photography in Photoshop

Posted in: infrared, IR, landscape, tutorial|

Fake infrared photo
This photo was created using technique described in this tutorial. It was full of greens captured on a sunny day. This kind of scenes works best with this technique.

It’s my 3rd tutorial about infrared photography. If you haven’t read previous ones yet, you can read them here:

  • Introduction to infrared photography – will introduce you to the world of infrared photograhy. In this part I talk about equipment needed to get started with IR photography and I also give some tips on taking infrared photos,
  • Post-processing infrared photos – in this part I focus on the post-processing of IR photos to get them this very typical look with blue skies and white foliage.

Both above tutorials assume that you either have an IR-modified camera (meaning that it takes photos in IR wavelengths instead of visible spectrum) or that you use infrared filter that you put in front of your lens. I do the latter – using Hoya R72 screw-in filter.

However, what if you don’t have any of these? Well, Photoshop can come to the rescue (as always) – you can simulate this effect and as you will see it’s very easy.

Please note that simulated effect won’t be identical as capturing real infrared photos but it will be pretty close. Also there are many ways of doing this in Photoshop and below I will just show you one of them.

    Step 1. Open your photo in Photoshop

    Start by opening your image in Photoshop. Please note that images that work best with this technique are the ones that have some sky and some foliage in the frame. Feel free to experiment with other types of images as you can still get some interesting results.
    Click on the photo to view it in large size on black background.

    Step 2. Duplicate background layer and invert colours

    Now, duplicate your background layer by using Layer -> Duplicate Layer menu item or by using CTRL + J keyboard shortcut (CMD + J if you’re on Mac).
    After that, make sure your newly created layer is selected and invert its colours by using Image -> Adjustments -> Invert menu item or by using handy CTRL + I keyboard shortcut (CMD + I if you’re on Mac).
    Inverted colours
    Click on the photo to view it in large size on black background.

    After that change blending mode of this layer to Colour:

    Click on the photo to view it in large size on black background.

    Step 3. Swap Red & Blue channels

    At the moment the image doesn’t resemble typical infrared photo at all. The sky is orange and it’s supposed to be blue; foliage is blue but it should be grey or white.
    So now it’s time to make our image look like an IR photo – with blue sky and grey/white foliage.
    We will start with creating Channel Mixer adjustment layer. Using this layer we will swap Reds and Blues. This way orange in the sky will become cyan/blue and blue trees will become light red.
    To do that select Layer -> New Adjustment Layer -> Channel Mixer.
    With your newly created Channel Mixer layer, make sure Red is selected in the Output Channel and set it as below:
    Now select Blue in the Output Channel and set it as below:

    As you might noticed what we basically just did is swapping red & blue channels.

    At this stage the image should look like the one below. The sky already has correct colour. The foliage, however, is now red. Fortunately this is quite easy to fix by decreasing saturation of reds to make them almost grey. And we will do this in the very next step.

    Photo with swapped red and blue channels
    Click on the photo to view it in large size on black background.

    Step 4. Fix saturation of colours

    As you can see in the image above, there are pretty lot of reds and some yellows and greens which normally aren’t visible in typical infrared photos. So the solution is to decrease saturation of them using Hue/Saturation adjustment layer. Also we will increase their lightness to make them look a bit brighter (leaves and grass reflects infrared so they normally are close to white). Please note that this step is highly dependant on the image. Sometimes you will need to make just tiny adjustments but sometimes you will have to drag saturation all the way down to 0.
    To do that use Layer -> New Adjustment Layer -> Hue/Saturation. For the image above I used following settings:
    • Reds:
      • Saturation: -86
      • Lightness: +26
    • Yellows:
      • Saturation: -25
      • Lightness: +71
    • Greens:
      • Saturation: -83
      • Lightness: +57
    • Magentas:
      • Saturation: -33

    And after that I got below image:

    Fake infrared photo
    Click on the photo to view it in large size on black background.
    And that’s all. At this point you can make further adjustments, like increasing contrast, brightening the trees or converting the image to black & white. But I will leave it to you.

    A few more samples

    Below you will find a few more samples of images processed using described technique.

    Fake infrared photo
    Click on the photo to view it in large size on black background.
    Fake infrared photo
    Click on the photo to view it in large size on black background.
    31 December 2013

    Crete in Infrared

    Posted in: crete, infrared, IR, landscape|

    Infrared photo from Crete
    Click on the photo to view it in large size on black background.

    Today I would like to share infrared photo I took in Ammoudara, Crete during last summer. It’s almost exactly same location as yesterday yet it looks so completely different due to using infrared filter which made the scene look surreal, maybe even a bit ethereal.

    If you’re interested in infrared photography yourself, make sure to read my free tutorials:

    I would also like to take this occasion to wish all my readers Happy New Year! I hope it will be a brilliant year for all of you, full of great moments in your lives and full of amazing photos.

    Technical details:
    Camera: Canon 5D MK III (read my review here)
    Lens: Canon 24-105 f/4 L IS USM
    Focal length: 24 mm
    Aperture: f/14.0
    Exposure time: 10 s (“middle” exposure)
    ISO: 1600
    Number of exposures: 1
    E.V. Step: n/a
    Flash used: no
    Tripod: yes
    Filters: Hoya IR R72
    Technique: infrared, luminosity masks
    Software: Magic Lantern 2.3, Lightroom 5.0, Photoshop CC, Topaz Clarity

    19 August 2013

    Post-processing infrared photos

    Posted in: infrared, IR, landscape, tutorial|

    Some time ago I shared a short tutorial: Introduction to Infrared photography. By that time I gave you just a few basic tips on how to take infrared photos and how to set white balance to make them look good. Today I would like to give some tips on how to process them as it isn’t that straightforward as you might think.

    First of all after you open your infrared photo in Lightroom or Photoshop you will notice that it is very reddish even if you set custom white balance in the camera (what I really recommend). It’s because both applications (and many others too) have fixed limits for white balance with minimum value being 2000. But in case of infrared photos you need much lower values to make your IR photos look good.

    So what you need to do is to create custom DNG profile to allow lower values.

    1. Download free Adobe application known as Adobe DNG Profile Editor.
    2. Convert your Infrared photo to DNG. To do that in Lightroom right-click on the photo and select Export -> Export To DNG.

    3. Open Adobe DNG Profile Editor and open your saved DNG photo in it.
    4. Go to the Color Matrices tab.

    Infrared photo opened in Adobe DNG Profile Editor before making any changes to the profile. This is how Adobe applications like Lightroom or Photoshop render infrared photos by default.

    5. Move the Temperature slider all the way to the left (-100). Your photo should look a bit better now:

    6. You’re done with editing DNG profile so save your newly created profile by selecting File -> Export Profile. In order to make your newly created profile accessible in Lightroom and Photoshop make sure to export it under following location:

    • If you’re on Windows: C:UsersUSER_NAMEAppDataRoamingAdobeCameraRawCameraProfiles
    •  If you’re on Mac: /Users/USER_NAME/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Camera Raw/Camera Profiles/

    Note that for each camera you own you must create separate profiles.
    7. Restart Lightroom (or Photoshop), go to Develop module and navigate to the Camera Calibration tab and select your newly created profile in Profile combo box. Your photo should now look much better. If the profile isn’t visible in the profile combo box make sure you exported it to the right place as specified in point 6.

    8. Now adjust white balance setting (usually by dragging it to the left). It should look like something like this at this stage:

    It doesn’t resemble typical infrared photo you probably saw over the net. Most commonly the sky has deep blue colour but in the image above you can clearly see that most common colours are still oranges and reds.

    We will fix that in the next few steps.

    9. At this stage I make some exposure corrections, fix whites etc. What I really recommend doing is dragging Blacks slider a bit to the left to add your photo some contrast because IR photos are often low contrast.
    10. Open your image in Photoshop.
    11. Create Channel Mixer adjustments layer.

    1. Select Red output channel and set Red to 0% and Blue to 100%.
    2. Select Blue output channel and set Red to 100% and Blue to 0%.

    This way we swapped Red & Blue channel and the image should look much more familiar:

    12. Final steps are optional. I usually increase saturation of Blues and Cyans and reduce saturation of Reds and Yellows. I also increase contrast using Levels adjustment layer.

    Also note that this tutorial showed just one way of post processing infrared photos. You can aim for completely different style (eg. black & white infrared photos are also very popular). As with any other photos your creativity is the limit.

    11 August 2013

    Infrared tiny planet

    Posted in: crete, infrared, IR, landscape, tiny planet|

    Today I’d like to share sort of unusual photo. Probably you’ve heard about tiny planets and infrared photography. If not take a look at my tutorials about creating tiny planets effect and introduction to infrared photography. This time I decided to combine the two and created infrared tiny planet. To do that I first captured infrared 360 degrees panorama in Greece and then converted it into a tiny planet.

    BTW I have a few ideas for tutorials for coming weeks and hope to share one next week.

    21 November 2012

    Jetty in infrared

    Posted in: IR, lake, landscape, Masuria|

    Today I decided to upload photo from Masuria. Infrared photo from Masuria to be exact. Sorry for not writing more but I’m really busy in the recent days.

    EXIF data:
    Camera: Canon 50D
    Lens: Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5 USM
    Focal length: 10
    Aperture: f/9.0
    Exposure time: 30 s
    ISO: 640
    Number of exposures: 1
    E.V. Step: n/a
    Flash used: no
    Tripod: yes
    Filters: Hoya IR R72
    Software: Lightroom 4.1, Photoshop CS5

    25 October 2012

    New IR and a few milestones reached today

    Posted in: Canary Islands, fuerteventura, IR, landscape|

    I’m really happy because today I reached two milestones for my photos and blog (yes, I reached both on the same day!). First of all I reached 100.000 views on 500px portal (here is the link to my stream). It isn’t that much compared to some 500px best photographers but it still means a lot to me. The second “achievement” is that my blog reached 10.000 page views in a single month (and there are still a few days till the end of October). Of course I would be even happier if it was about visits but still quite a good result for a blog which in March this year had something around 300 views (yes only three hundred!).

    Now a few words about the photo from this post. It is an infrared photography I took on the Fuerteventura Island. If you aren’t familiar with infrared photography head over to my tutorial about it. It was quite windy so I decided to use faster shutter speeds (if 3 seconds can called be that way…) what required increasing the ISO and using quite fast aperture as well. This in turned resulted in rather shallow depth of field. Although f/6.3 for a focal length of 24 mm is quite much note how close to the foreground I was. So what I did was to take several photos with different points of focus and to stack them (I wrote tutorial about it as well). As this photo has some nice textures, details and light & shadows play I decided to use black & white conversion for it.

    EXIF data:
    Camera: Canon 5D MK II
    Lens: Canon 24-105 f/4 L IS USM
    Focal length: 24
    Aperture: f/6.3
    Exposure time: 3.2 s
    ISO: 1600
    Number of exposures: 1
    E.V. Step: n/a
    Flash used: no
    Tripod: yes
    Filters: Hoya IR R72
    Software: Lightroom 4.1, Photoshop CS5